She Did Not Die in Vain…

Written by The Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds (SCSCB)

Machi being fitted with satellite transmitter in August, 2009. © Bart Paxton.
Machi being fitted with satellite transmitter in August, 2009. © Bart Paxton.
When “Machi,” a Whimbrel carrying a satellite transmitter, was shot and killed in Guadeloupe in September 2011, the international bird conservation community had a rude wake-up call about what was happening to migrating shorebirds in the French West Indies. The fact was that tens of thousands of shorebirds representing several species were being shot by hunters each fall. Swift action by the Society for the Conservation of Caribbean Birds (SCSCB) and its members and partners, including AMAZONA (the local bird conservation organization), has resulted in significant progress on the issue of shorebird hunting.
Tracking map of Machi’s migration (2009-2011)
Tracking map of Machi’s migration (2009-2011)
Whimbrels are amazing long distance migrants. Machi had been tracked for over 27,000 miles (44,000 km) back and forth between the breeding grounds in the Hudson Bay Lowlands of Canada to wintering grounds on the coast of Brazil. In 2011, we had learned from the satellite tracking study being conducted by the Center for Conservation Biology that Machi, after hunkering down in Montserrat during Tropical Storm Maria, flew to Guadeloupe where she met her end. Ongoing tracking studies have shown that Whimbrels like Machi and other shorebirds utilize the Caribbean islands to rest and refuel, take refuge from dangerous storms, or spend the winter. However, the journey ends for many that attempt to stop in Guadeloupe, Martinique, or Barbados, where sport hunting of shorebirds remains a popular tradition.
At the time when Machi and a second satellite-tagged Whimbrel named Goshen were killed, there were no daily bag limits in the French West Indies, and no protection for species of conservation concern, such as the Red Knot. Thankfully, due to proactive advocacy, there have been some positive changes in hunting regulations since Machi’s death.
Following the shooting of the two shorebirds and in light of the fact that populations of many shorebird species are declining in the Americas, SCSCB organized a letter writing campaign targeting decision makers in environmental departments of the French government as well as other key authorities and international organizations. Many SCSCB members and partners sent letters to these officials, urging them to take actions in support of a more sustainable and responsible harvest. They also wrote about the issue in their local newspapers, websites, and blogs (see links to some of these below).
As a result of this international campaign and months of dedicated work by the National Hunting and Wildlife Agency (ONCFS) together with other departments and local hunters, there has been a change in policy which benefits migratory shorebirds that rely on these islands’ mangroves and wetlands as wintering and critical stopover sites during their long migrations.
The Ministère de l’Environnement and the Fédération Départementale des Chasseurs de la Guadeloupe and Fédération Départementale des Chasseurs de la Martinique have acted to place some restrictions on shorebird harvest: First, the Red Knot (beginning in 2012) and Solitary Sandpiper (2013) were closed to hunting on Guadeloupe and the Red Knot was closed to hunting on Martinique in 2013. The Ministère de l’Environnement in Paris is also considering long-term removal of the Red Knot from the list of hunted species. Second, a bag limit of 20 birds per day per hunter was instituted in Guadeloupe in 2013. This action of setting bag limits, initiated by an Overseas Department, is a rare action for the French hunting community and regulatory agency. Finally, a three-year moratorium on the shooting of Whimbrels and Hudsonian Godwits was put in place in Martinique in 2013.
The SCSCB community is encouraged by these outcomes. Lisa Sorenson, Executive Director of SCSCB commented, “Machi’s death drew attention to the fate that awaits hundreds of thousands of other shorebirds that pass through the Caribbean in the future, and provided an opportunity to encourage these governments to adopt more sustainable hunting regulations. There is still much work to be done, but we consider the change in hunting laws to be a very important and significant conservation outcome. Machi did not die in vain.”
“We applaud the French government’s and the Fédérations des Chasseurs of Guadeloupe and Martinique actions on this issue, and we want to thank our members and partners for their help in bringing about this positive change.” – said Howard Nelson, President of SCSCB
“We all need to remain vigilant about issues like this throughout the region as we continue to work to conserve resident and migratory birds for future generations to enjoy.” – he added
Nelson remarked that the Society supports broader social and ecological values of shorebirds and that in the longer term, he was hopeful that this would support meaningful behavior change on the islands.

Whimbrels completed 3rd leg of unknown loop migration route

Written by Bryan Watts & Fletcher Smith/The Center for Conservation Biology
Scientists at the Center for Conservation Biology have tracked 3 Whimbrels from wintering areas on the coast of Brazil on a nonstop, 4,000 mile (6,400 kilometer) flight to the Gulf of Mexico. This flight represents the third leg of a previously unknown loop migration route and connects four widely scattered locations in the conservation of this declining species.
The three birds named Mackenzie (for the river where they breed), Akpik (named for the cloudberry that the birds feed on in the fall) and Pingo (named for an arctic formation caused by permafrost) left their wintering grounds near Sao Luis, Brazil between 9 and 13 April. The birds flew nonstop for 95 to 100 hours averaging 40 miles per hour (67 kilometers per hour) before reaching the Gulf of Mexico. Originally captured and marked on the breeding grounds along the Mackenzie River in far western Canada in June of 2012, the birds took a bold fall migration route flying 2,800 miles (4,500 kilometers) to the east coast of Canada in mid-July to stage for 2 weeks before embarking on a marathon 4,300-mile (6,900-kilometer) flight out over the open ocean to the northern coast of South America. All three birds have spent just over 7 months in the extensive tidal system of the Gulf of Maranhao before initiating their migration north.
Map of migration route for 3 whimbrels marked on breeding ground in western Canada. Recent flight from Brazil to Gulf of Mexico was previously undocumented. Photo by CCB.
Map of the migration route for 3 hombres marked on breeding grounds in western Canada. A recent flight from Brazil to Gulf of Mexico was previously undocumented. Photo by CCB
All three birds are currently staging in different locations. Akpik is staging in Laguna Madre within the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico a site known to be a critical wintering area for the closely related long-billed curlew. Mackenzie is near the Demieres Isles in southern Louisiana. Pingo is in and around Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge south of Houston, Texas the site of a recently discovered spring staging area of hemispheric importance to Whimbrels. Understanding the connectivity of this site to breeding areas has become a high priority for the research community. The bird appears to be using farm fields that have been managed over the winter for migrating shorebirds.
Mackenzie, Akpik and Pingo, all from the same breeding location, have now linked sites in far-flung, unexpected regions in their orb of conservation. Important in their own right, each of these sites must be considered collectively for conservation efforts to be effective. Mackenzie, the bird fitted with the recycled transmitter of Machi (a bird shot on Guadeloupe in September of 2011) is now staging in the heart of the area impacted by the Deep Horizon Oil Spill. The spill began on 20 April, during the time of Whimbrel staging in 2010. Such events highlight the fragility of conservation networks and the importance of locations and cultures working together toward common goals. Through these birds we now know that an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may impact a breeding population on the Mackenzie River, or a staging area in Nova Scotia, or a wintering area around the mouth of the Amazon. Understanding these linkages is a critical step in protecting these networks and the species that depend on them.
Fletcher Smith with Akpik on breeding ground in the Canadian Arctic. This bird is now staging in Laguna Madre. Photo by CCB.
Fletcher Smith with Akpik on breeding ground in the Canadian Arctic. This bird is now staging in Laguna Madre. Photo by CCB.
The three Whimbrels are part of a larger project that has included 20 additional birds that have been tracked to better understand migratory pathways and locations that are critical for this declining species. The study has tracked Whimbrels for more than 200,000 miles (322,000 kilometers) since 2008. The broader tracking project is a collaborative effort between The Center for Conservation Biology, The Canadian Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, and Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.
Follow the migration routes of these Whimbrels and others at the Seaturtle.org Wildlife Tracking page.

Meet Postel, The Tagged Whimbrel

Written by Haley Jordan/Manomet Center for for Conservation Sciences
Satellite tagged Whimbrel named Postel. © Tim Keyes
Satellite tagged Whimbrel named Postel. © Tim Keyes
This Whimbrel was caught last spring in Georgia by Shorebird Recovery Project Conservation Specialist Brad Winn and partners and fitted with a solar-powered satellite transmitter, which shows us where he goes and what resources he depends on throughout the year.
As of last week, Postel was still in his winter territory on Caranguejos Island, Brazil.
Whimbrels are able to fly one of the longest non-stop flights of any bird in the world. Some have traveled 4,500 miles non-stop from eastern Canada to South America. Most of these flights include extensive time over open-ocean, and some involve as many as seven days and nights of flying.
Brad will spend the coming week in Georgia catching Whimbrels and fitting a few of them with transmitters with Tim Keyes of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and Fletcher Smith of the William & Mary Center for Conservation Biology.
Perhaps they will see Postel, who is expected to arrive at the very same marsh where he was fitted with his transmitter last year. There, he will feast on fiddler crabs to refuel his journey to breeding grounds at the western edge of Hudson Bay in Canada.
To follow Postel’s journey, visit http://www.seaturtle.org/tracking/?tag_id=105874&dyn=1365430497.
Follow Brad on Twitter @BradfordWinn for updates from the field!

Pingo: The Whimbrel Around the Tropical Storm Isaac

Written by Fletcher M Smith

Pingo, the Whimbrel has striked around the Tropical Storm Isaac and is likely headed for either French Guiana or Brazil. As of 22 August at 11PM (Eastern time) the bird was 300 miles from landfall. The Whimbrel was averaging 35mph before hitting the storm, and averaged 25mph after, so the storm only had a minor effect on the flight speed and bearing.

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Brassy whimbrels fly more than 2,500 miles out to sea and through the heart of the Atlantic Ocean completing a nonstop flight of 6 days

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Scientists at the Center for Conservation Biology (CCB) have tracked 3 whimbrels off the east coast of Canada to the northern shore of South America via a previously unknown migration pathway over the open Atlantic Ocean. The route passed through the center of the vast Atlantic at one point passing 1,000 miles closer to Africa than to North America and within 700 miles of the Cape Verde Islands. The bird with the longest flight flew nonstop for 145 hours (6 days) covering a distance of 7,000 kilometers (4,355 miles).

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The three birds named Mackenzie, Taglu, and Akpik were originally marked by CCB and Canadian Wildlife Service staff on the breeding grounds along the Mackenzie River Delta in far north-western Canada (Mackenzie was fitted with a transmitter recovered from Machi, a bird that was shot on Guadeloupe in September of 2011). In mid-July the birds flew across the continent to the east coast of Canada and staged for approximately 2 weeks in the James Bay and the Gulf of St. Lawrence to build fat reserves. The birds then flew southeast, reaching the center of the Atlantic Ocean before turning south and making landfall in South America between Guyana and Brazil. Although this portion of the Atlantic is used by true seabirds that roost on the water, it is so isolated from shore that species such as whimbrel that cannot land on water were not believed to reach it. The birds may receive some benefit from venturing this far out to sea in the form of favorable tailwinds. Mackenzie averaged just under 30 miles per hour (48 kilometers per hour) for the 6-day flight.

The three birds are part of a larger project that has included 20 additional birds that have been tracked to better understand migratory pathways and locations that are critical for this declining species. The study has tracked whimbrels for more than 185,000 miles (300,000 kilometers) since 2008. The broader tracking project is a collaborative effort between The Center for Conservation Biology, The Canadian Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, and Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.

Chilean Ministry of Environment and Manomet Center Sign Shorebird Agreement

Written by Meredith Gutowski/WHSRN

The Chilean Ministry of the Environment has signed an agreement with Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences to collaborate on shorebird and wetland conservation efforts on the critically important island of Chiloé. Under the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding, the Manomet Center and the Chilean government will work together to implement the National Strategy for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wetlands of Chile as well as the Migratory Shorebird Conservation Plan for Chiloé.

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(Hudsonian) Whimbrel is a wintering shorebird along the Chilean coastline. © György Szimuly

Chiloé Island, located off the coast of southern Chile, is home to a great number of migratory shorebirds that fly more than 9,300 miles from the northern hemisphere every year to winter within the island’s coastal wetlands. These wetlands support 99% of the Pacific Coast population or 27% of the global population of Hudsonian Godwit (Limosa haemastica) and 61% of the Pacific Coast population of Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus). Both shorebird species breed in North America and are considered of high conservation concern. The entire system of wetlands in eastern Chiloé was designated as a WHSRN Site of Hemispheric Importance in January 2011.

Wetlands are a strategic resource for Chile, providing a wide range of environmental goods and services that allow us to sustain biodiversity and contribute to the welfare of our communities,” said Ricardo Sanchez Irarrázabal, Chile’s Assistant Secretary for Environment. “This new partnership with the Manomet Center will allow us to leverage resources and facilitate access to information for making effective conservation decisions for the wetlands of Chiloe as vital ecosystems to sustain populations of migratory birds.

The Chilean Ministry of the Environment and Manomet Center are working with local governments to prepare effective regulations that will protect Chiloé’s wetlands and designate municipal reserves on the island.

The partners also are promoting awareness and pride among local communities towards their island’s unique shorebird and wetland resources, through projects such as “Chiloé: Birds and Cultural Heritage.” The Ministry’s Regional Secretariat for the Lakes Region, together with the Municipality of Castro, is leading and coordinating the “Chiloé Wetland Roundtable: Everyone’s Heritage.” This public-private forum is designed to strengthen local capacity to promote and implement conservation actions.

Diego Luna Quevedo, Manomet Center’s Southern Cone Program Coordinator, added that shorebird conservation could also provide an economic boost to the community. “Beyond the importance of biodiversity, conserving wetlands as critical habitat for migratory shorebirds in Chiloé adds value to the area overall that will attract, expand, or enhance opportunities for tourism,” said Quevedo. “The work of this partnership will benefit the overall quality of life of the communities on the island.

For more information, please contact Diego Luna Quevedo (diego.luna@manomet.org), Southern Cone Program Coordinator, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.

Goshen, a shorebird tracked by scientists, becomes second study bird to be lost on Guadeloupe

Written by Dr. Bryan D. Watts/Center for Conservation Biology, College of William and Mary, Virginia Commonwealth University

Scientists at the Center for Conservation Biology have determined that a second whimbrel they had been tracking as part of a long-term migration study has been lost in a shooting swamp on the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. Goshen was lost in a heavily hunted swamp just north of the town of Port-Louis almost immediately upon arrival on the island. Although the transmitter has not been recovered the last satellite signals place the bird in the center of the shooting swamp. It now appears that both Machi and Goshen were shot in the morning of 12 September shortly after arriving.

Goshen and Machi were not migrating together but both stopped on the island after encountering different storm systems. Goshen flew through the east side of Hurricane Irene, landed on Montserrat, spent a week on Antigua and then flew to Guadeloupe. Machi flew through Tropical Storm Maria, landed on Montserrat and then flew directly to Guadeloupe. The two whimbrels were the first birds during the four-year tracking study to stop on Guadeloupe and both were lost within hours suggesting that the hunting pressure on this island is extremely high. This island has several isolated mangrove swamps that serve to concentrate the shorebirds for shooting. An estimated 3,000 hunters participate in the shorebird hunt annually. Currently, shooting parties on the island are not regulated and no information is available on the number of shorebirds taken. Without such information it is not possible to assess the potential relationship between hunting and ongoing population declines.

Whimbrels migrating along the western Atlantic coast have declined by 50% since the mid-1990s. The collaborative tracking study has successfully tracked 17 whimbrels via satellite since the spring of 2008.  The focus of this study has been to collect information that is vital to the long-term conservation of this population. Only 4 birds were being tracked during the 2011 fall migration season and half of those were lost in a single morning on Guadeloupe. The relationship between hunting pressures within the Lesser Antilles and population declines for the whimbrel and other shorebird species is unknown.

Most of the hunting activity conducted in the Lesser Antilles appears to be recreational. A video produced by a hunter on Guadeloupe within the same swamp where Goshen was lost illustrates the habitat, the shorebirds, and the shooting activity.

The tracking project is a collaborative effort between The Center for Conservation Biology, The Nature Conservancy, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, and Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.

 

Machi a shorebird tracked by scientists survives tropical storm only to be killed by hunters on Guadeloupe

Written by Fletcher M. Smith/Center for Conservation Biology, College of William and Mary, Virginia Commonwealth University

Scientists at the Center for Conservation Biology learned today that a whimbrel that they had been tracking via satellite for 2 years as part of a migration study had been shot by a hunting party this morning on the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe (French West Indies). The bird named “Machi” had just flown through Tropical Storm Maria and made landfall on Montserrat before flying to Guadeloupe. Machi had been tracked for over 27,000 miles (44,000 km) back and forth between breeding grounds in the Hudson Bay Lowlands of Canada to wintering grounds on the coast of Brazil. The bird was tracked on 7 nonstop flights of more than 2,000 miles. During the spring of 2010, Machi flew more than 3,400 miles directly from Brazil to South Carolina. Machi serves as an example of birds that interact with many landscapes and cultures throughout the year and a reminder of how international cooperation is required for their continued existence.

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Machi being fitted with satellite transmitter in August, 2009. © Bart Paxton

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Machi after release. © Bart Paxton

Guadeloupe, Martinique and Barbados continue to operate “shooting swamps” some of which are artificial wetlands created to attract migrant shorebirds for sport shooting during fall migration. It is estimated that tens of thousands of shorebirds continue to be taken annually by hunting clubs on just these three islands. This practice is a throwback to more than a century ago when gunners hunted shorebirds throughout the Americas. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed, in part, to protect dwindling numbers of birds that migrate across country borders. Operated as a French overseas department, both Guadeloupe and Martinique are part of the European Union and are not party to the Treaty. Barbados, once a British colony is now an independent state and also not party to the Treaty. The last Eskimo Curlew known to science was shot on Barbados in 1963. Shorebird hunting within these areas continues to be unregulated to the present time. Conservation organizations continue to work toward some compromise that will reduce pressures on declining species.  

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Machi is at Box Tree Creek where the bird it was captured on the Eastern Shore of Virginia in August 2009. © Barry Truitt

Worldwide, many shorebird populations are experiencing dramatic declines. Most of the migratory shorebird species breeding in eastern North America and the Arctic pass over the Caribbean region during the late summer and early fall on their way to wintering grounds. When they encounter severe storms the birds use the islands as refuges before moving on to their final destinations. Hunting clubs take advantage of these events and shoot large numbers of downed birds following the passage of these storms. During the 2009 and 2010 fall migrations, Machi did not stop on any of the islands but flew directly from Virginia to Paramaribo, Suriname before moving on to winter near Sao Luis, Brazil. It appears that the encounter with Tropical Storm Maria caused the bird to stop on Guadeloupe. 

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Tracking map of Machi (2009-2011).

Machi contributed a great deal to what we know about whimbrel migration along the western Atlantic. Satellite tracks of this bird over 4 full migrations (http://www.ccb-wm.org/programs/migration/Whimbrel/whimbrel.htm) linked breeding and wintering areas, defined migration routes, identified important migration staging areas, and demonstrated how these birds interact with major tropical systems. This tracking project is a collaborative effort between The Center for Conservation Biology, The Nature Conservancy, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, and Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.

Hope returns to the Delmarva Peninsula

Written by Dr. Bryan D. Watts/Center for Conservation Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University & Barry Truitt/The Nature Conservancy

The odyssey of Hope, a whimbrel carrying a satellite transmitter, continues to amaze scientists. Hope was originally captured on 19 May, 2009 on the southern Delmarva Peninsula of Virginia. She left Virginia on May 26 and since that time has logged more than 21,000 miles (33,000 kilometers) flying between a breeding territory on the MacKenzie River near Alaska and a winter territory on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. On Friday (8 April, 2011), Hope returned to Virginia following a 75 hour, 1,850 mile (2,900 kilometer) flight out over the Atlantic Ocean.

During the course of two full migration cycles, Hope has clearly demonstrated how distant locations are interconnected in the life of migratory species and how their conservation requires collaboration on a multi-national scale. For three consecutive springs, Hope has returned to the same creek in Virginia where she has fed on fiddler crabs preparing for a transcontinental flight to her breeding grounds. The creek, located in the  the Conservancy’s Virginia Coast Reserve, is part of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network, a network of international sites considered critical to populations of declining shorebirds. Hope’s breeding grounds on the MacKenzie River are part of an International Important Bird Area and one of the areas of highest conservation value in Canada. Efforts are ongoing to protect the area considered by many to be one of the most pristine watersheds remaining in North America. For the past 2 years, Hope has wintered at Great Pond, a Birdlife International Important Bird Area on St. Croix. Protection of long-distance migrants like Hope requires that countries recognize the importance of vulnerable populations and work together toward effective conservation solutions.

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Tracking map – Map of Hope movements from May of 2009 through April of 2011. She has been tracked using a 9.5-gram, solar-powered satellite transmitter.

Hope is one of several birds that have been fitted with state of the art 9.5-gram, satellite transmitters in a collaborative effort by the Center for Conservation Biology at the College of William and Mary – Virginia Commonwealth University and the Virginia Coast Reserve of The Nature Conservancy to discover migratory routes that connect breeding and winter areas and to identify en route migratory staging areas that are critical to the conservation of this declining species.

Updated tracking maps may be viewed online at
http://www.ccb-wm.org/programs/migration/Whimbrel/whimbrel.htm

Satellite tracking represents only one aspect of a broader, integrated investigation of whimbrel migration. During the past 4 years, the Center for Conservation in partnership with The Nature Conservancy has used conventional transmitters to examine stopover duration, conducted aerial surveys to estimate seasonal numbers, collected feather samples to locate summer and winter areas through stable-isotope analysis, and has initiated a whimbrel watch program. Continued research is planned to further link populations across staging, breeding, and wintering areas. Funding has been provided by The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Conservation Biology, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The Toronto Ornithological Club, the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and the Northern Neck Audubon Society.

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Hope fitted with satellite transmitter. © Barry Truitt

Manomet Receives Funding for Chilo?? Island Shorebird Conservation

Written by Meredith Gutowski/WHSRN

The wetlands on the eastern coast of Chiloé Island, located in southern Chile’s Región de los Lagos, constitute the most important wintering area in the Western Hemisphere for two high-priority shorebird species: Hudsonian Godwit (Limosa haemastica) and Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus). The island supports up to 27% of the Hudsonian Godwit’s global population and 99% of its Pacific coast population; it also supports 61% of the Pacific coast population of Whimbrel. Both species breed in North America, and are considered a high conservation concern.

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Limosa haemastica. © Pablo Petracci

Recognizing Chiloé’s significance for these and other migratory shorebirds, an international coalition of partners has been working with their counterparts in Chile to develop a shorebird conservation plan for this area of global importance. The coalition includes The Nature Conservancy (TNC), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Audubon Society, and the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences’ Shorebird Recovery Project. In-country partners include Chile’s Ministry of Environment, the government of Región de los Lagos, the Center for the Study and Conservation of Chile’s Natural Heritage (CECPAN by its Spanish acronym), Conservación Marina, and several other local nongovernmental organizations and municipalities.

The first phase of the coalition’s project was completed in 2010 thanks to generous support from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. In that phase, led by TNC with direct participation from a broad range of local community representatives, partners identified and prioritized critical threats to shorebirds on the island, the sources of those threats, and strategies for abating them.

In December 2010, on behalf of the coalition, Manomet received a $250,000 grant from the Packard Foundation to begin the project’s second phase—implementing the Conservation Plan for Migratory Birds in Chiloé. Grant funds will support targeted priority actions including education and outreach, social marketing, awareness-building, long-term shorebird monitoring, land protection, and conservation infrastructure development. Partners will be working with the communities of Caulin, Putemún, Pullao, Chullec, Curaco de Velez, and Huildad-Yaldad on Chiloé.  

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Thanks to funding received in December 2010, Chiloé Island’s shorebird conservation plan will be implemented in six communities.

The full press release is available on Manomet’s website. 

For more information, please contact Diego Luna Quevedo (diego.luna@manomet.org), Southern Cone Program Coordinator, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, or Charles Duncan (cduncan@manomet.org), Director, Shorebird Recovery Project, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.