Mongolia: Shorebirds’ training 2014

The Mongolian Ornithological Society (MOS) organizes an annual event “Shorebirds’ training” event annually at Tsengiin tsagaan nuur located in on the border between Bayannuur soum and Dashinchilen soum, Bulgan province.
This year the event was organized during the 22nd, 23rd, and 24th of August. On the first day, we gave a talk to local people at the administration office of Bayannuur soum center, with the purpose of disseminating knowledge about shorebirds and wildlife conservation.
Every year we deliver training on teach basic knowledge of bird ringing, counting, capturing, identifying and photographing to the participants of our annual event. The participants are from local conservation societies and NGOs, universities, colleges and bird watchers.
During the event, we counted all the birds observed around the lake. And tThe result was 14,368 individuals involving 74 species of birds. The most common bird recorded in this year was the Pacific Golden Plover with counted in 5516 individuals recorded. Some rare species are found every year around the lake including Asian Dowitcher, White-naped Crane, Swan Goose, Pallas’ Bunting and Cinereous Vulture.

Шөвгөн хараалж Gallinago gallinago Common Snipe
Шөвгөн хараалж Gallinago gallinago Common Snipe
Усны түнжүүр Rallus aquaticus Water Rail
Усны түнжүүр Rallus aquaticus Water Rail
Усны түнжүүр Rallus aquaticus Water Rail
Усны түнжүүр Rallus aquaticus Water Rail
Умардын хавтгайлж Vanellus vanellus Northern Lapwing
Умардын хавтгайлж Vanellus vanellus Northern Lapwing
Матигар хөгчүүлэг Xenus cinereus Terek Sandpiper
Матигар хөгчүүлэг Xenus cinereus Terek Sandpiper
Темминскийн элсэг Calidris temminckii Temminck’s Stint
Темминскийн элсэг Calidris temminckii Temminck’s Stint
During measurement and banding...
During measurement and banding…
Some of the attendants holding new brochure "Mongolian shorebirds".
Some of the attendants holding new brochure “Mongolian shorebirds”.
Mist netting
Mist netting
During the event, we met some local people and give them our new brochure called "Mongolian shorebirds" in which we wrote about biology, ecology of shorebirds and, their biological and ecological importance.
During the event, we met some local people and give them our new brochure called “Mongolian shorebirds” in which we wrote about biology, ecology of shorebirds and, their biological and ecological importance.
During the event, we met some local people and give them our new brochure called "Mongolian shorebirds" in which we wrote about biology, ecology of shorebirds and, their biological and ecological importance.
During the event, we met some local people and give them our new brochure called “Mongolian shorebirds” in which we wrote about biology, ecology of shorebirds and, their biological and ecological importance.
Шартүрүүт элсэг Calidris ruficollis Red-necked Stint
Шартүрүүт элсэг Calidris ruficollis Red-necked Stint in front
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
зийн сүвээцагаан Pluvialis fulva Pacific Golden Plover
Замбын хараалж Gallinago stenura Pin-tailed Snipe
Замбын хараалж Gallinago stenura Pin-tailed Snipe
Савар элсэг Calidris subminuta Long-toed Stint
Савар элсэг Calidris subminuta Long-toed Stint
Black-tailed Godwit Морин цууцал Limosa limosa
Black-tailed Godwit Морин цууцал Limosa limosa
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5th Annual Shorebird Festival, San Antonio Bay, Argentina

Written by Meredith Gutowski Morhouse/WHSRN
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The San Antonio Bay Shorebird Festival in Rio Negro, Argentina, has become one of the biggest local events to have a major impact on the country and even the Southern Cone. The festival is renowned both for the originality of its activities and the degree of coordination among the local actors, as well as for its artistic materials and call to action. San Antonio Bay is a WHSRN Site of International Importance and a critical resource during the long migration of rufa Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa), a subspecies of high conservation concern.
The nongovernmental organization Inalafquen Foundation, in collaboration with various public and private institutions, merchants, and neighbors, welcomed the community to join in celebrating the bay’s 5th Annual Shorebird Festival last weekend, 22 and 23 March. Most activities took place in the Plaza Luis Piedra Buena in the village of Las Grutas.
The festival’s many interesting activities are listed below, but you can see the entire program and schedules on the public Festival Facebook page (no account required).
MIGRATION: A reading and writing workshop for adults.
FLYING BIRD: Aerial trip. Win a trip for 3 people to see San Antonio Bay as the shorebirds do – by air!
PAINTING THE SKIES: A collective mural-painting workshop.
FOOTPRINTS: Mosaic and sculpture workshop for kids 7–11 years old. We will work on a story and paint it on tiles.
FLIGHT WITHIN FLIGHT. “Stop Motion” video workshop for kids 10 and older. The resulting video from this activity will be sent to kids at other festivals.
GAME BOOTHS: 10 stations with themed games to learn all about shorebirds: what are they, the different species, migratory routes, feeding, molting, banding, etc. Includes raffles and prizes.
SHOWS: Theater performances, puppets, and music in the square.
NATURE WALK AND BIRDING: We will walk along the wetland towards Flight Latitude 40 Nature Center to visit a birding area and have a guided tour.
Three lucky festival-goers won a shorebird’s-eye view of San Antonio Bay this weekend!
The winner artwork of the 'Concurso Internacional de Ilustración' entitled 'Arribos' (Arriwals) made by a 22 years old Argentinean artist, Natalia Raquel Bogado. Image copyright of Festival de Aves Playeras Bahía San Antonio
The winner artwork of the ‘Concurso Internacional de Ilustración’ entitled ‘Arribos’ (Arriwals) made by a 22 years old Argentinean artist, Natalia Raquel Bogado. Image copyright of Festival de Aves Playeras Bahía San Antonio
Additionally, and for the first time, an art contest was held prior to the festival, with the theme “Flights that inspire, skies that connect.” An international jury, chaired by renowned Argentine artist and illustrator Aldo Chiappe, selected 24 works which were exhibited at Las Grutas Cultural Center from 22 to 24 March. Surpassing all expectations, the contest rules and shorebird materials were sent to over 3,500 applicants and a total of 425 pieces of art were submitted from around the world! Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Venezuela, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Mexico, United States of America, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Bulgaria! The winner was Natalia Raquel Bogado, a talented 22-year-old artist from Argentina, for her piece entitled “Arrivals”. ¡Felicitaciones!
Please visit and “Like” the public Festival Facebook page to see all the news from this year’s event.
For more information, contact Ms. Mirta Carbajal (diapontia@gmail.com), President, Inalafquen Foundation, San Antonio Oeste, Argentina.

Shorebird Illustration Competition: 28 February 2014

Written by Meredith Gutowski Morehouse/WHSRN
San Antonio Bay, a WHSRN Site of International Importance, will celebrate its 5th Annual Shorebird Festival on 22–23 March 2014 in Las Grutas, Rio Negro, Argentina. The Inalafquen Foundation and the festival’s organizing committee have launched an International Illustration Competition to encourage artwork that depicts the subject of shorebirds and illustrates the contest’s slogan:

Flights that inspire, skies that connect.

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The deadline is 28 February 2014, and winners will be announced 14 March 2014. A maximum of 2 entries per participant. The top prize is a cruise to Antarctica!, departing from and returning to the City of Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, during the 2014-2015 season. The jury will also select a second- and third-place winner, and three honorable mentions.
For all other details and information on the contest, visit the International Illustration Competition web page.
Good Luck!

Proposal for the World Shorebirds Day

Written by Gyorgy Szimuly/WorldWaders
There is no better time to set the bar for the next level in raising global public awareness about the conservation of and research on shorebirds than today. About half of the world’s shorebird populations are in decline, and the rate of habitat loss is worse than ever before.
Healthy populations of shorebirds mean healthy wetlands, what thousands of human lives depend on. Actions on a global level need to be organised to get people connected with shorebirds, their spectacular life and their habitats.
To celebrate shorebirds around the world, one commemorative day should be set, World Shorebirds Day, dedicated to special events.

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Here is my proposal to launch the World Shorebirds Day for the first time in 2014. You are more than welcome to comment or review it and share it within your network.
Note: this is not a confirmed event! The final decision to be announced widely.

Godwit Days 2013

GODWIT DAYS SPRING MIGRATION BIRD FESTIVAL APRIL 18 – 24, 2013
Come celebrate the Marbled Godwit and explore the lush Redwood Coast. Observe many bird species and wildlife through our selection of field trips, lectures, workshops, and boat excursions led by experienced local guides. Tour the expansive mudflats, the wild river valleys and the rocky ocean coast of this sector of the Klamath bioregion in northwest California.
Learn more about the festival

The business of shorebirds

Written by Bryan Watts/Center for Conservation Biology
In early March, more than 50 international shorebird scientists from government agencies, NGOs, and academic institutions lead by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service completed and released Phase 1 of the Atlantic Flyway Shorebird Business Strategy. Other phases are to follow that will be more focused on critical areas of the flyway including the Caribbean, Central and South America. Designed to halt and reverse population declines for species using the Atlantic Coast, the strategy is intended to be a blueprint for funding and implementation. The completion of this 2-year effort is a true milestone in shorebird conservation. It represents a call to action for both the conservation community and funders both of which are needed to achieve success.
Shorebirds flying into a high tide roost. Photo by Bart Paxton
Shorebirds flying into a high tide roost. Photo by Bart Paxton
Download the full strategy
The Western Atlantic Flyway supports one of the largest near-shore movement corridors of birds in the world. The flyway hosts hundreds of millions of birds annually, many of which are of conservation concern. The assemblage of birds that utilize the flyway is diverse and their relationships to the Atlantic Coast are varied. The greatest volume of birds uses the flyway as a movement corridor between breeding and wintering grounds. Birds funnel through the flyway from a broad geographic area ranging from the high latitudes of northern Europe to Siberia. All individuals from entire populations or species may move through the flyway making the area particularly significant for their survival. In addition to using the coastline as a movement corridor, many species use portions of the Atlantic Coast as migratory staging areas, breeding grounds or wintering grounds.
Bryan Watts measures a dunlin during spring migration along the Virginia coast. Photo by Fletcher Smith
Bryan Watts measures a dunlin during spring migration along the Virginia coast. Photo by Fletcher Smith
Shorebirds are among the most migratory groups of animals known to science. Of the 35 species of shorebirds that migrate along the Atlantic Flyway the majority are believed to be declining and several are in desperate need of conservation action. The business strategy attempts to identify critical factors contributing to declines, actions and associated funding needed to curb declines, and metrics of success.
The Center for Conservation Biology is a leader in shorebird research particularly in the mid-Atlantic region and has conducted survey work or focused projects on most species that utilize the flyway. Bryan Watts and Fletcher Smith contributed to this ground-breaking effort.

Fabien Rojizo Gets a New Plane, or How to Build A Constituency for Shorebird Conservation

Written by Mirta Carbajal/Fundación Inalafquen and Charles Duncan/Manomet
Argentina, end of the 1920s. The prosperity of early 20th century Argentina and the vast distances between its cities led to the creation of Aeroposta Argentina, the airmail. The Patagonian route was opened in 1929, flying mail from Bahía Blanca to Comodoro Rivadavia in French-made single-engine, open-cockpit planes. Among the handful of brave and skilled pilots flying th
is route was one Antoine de Saint Exupery who later became known and loved worldwide for his story “The Little Prince.”
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Less well-known is Saint Exupery’s chilling novel “Night Flight,” the story of the last flight of Fabien, one of the airmail pilots. Heading north at night to Buenos Aires after taking off from the town of San Antonio Oeste, Fabien encounters a huge storm that covers the entire center of Argentina…
Today, San Antonio Oeste is a popular Argentine summer beach resort town. It is also the most important northbound stopover site for Red Knots in South America, recognized as a Site of International Importance in the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network. Unfortunately, the total disconnect between these two worlds threatened the knots. Beachgoers rode 4-wheelers across sensitive habitat, and local authorities authorized incompatible projects.
Our two organizations realized that what was needed was a way to inform the public, both the residents and the visitors. But even more, we sought to engage them on an emotional, as well as intellectual level, with shorebirds and conservation. We first collaborated on the creation of Vuelo Latitud 40 (Flight Latitude 40), a nature interpretation center with that goal in mind. Manomet raised funds as part of a grant from the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation while Fundación Inalafquen provided the vision, design and hard work required to create a place that is both appealing to visitors and effective in delivering its message.
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One part of the Center is the Red Knot Club where children can play at being scientists studying shorebirds through participatory activities. We needed a mascot to tell the stories to the youngest ones, and Fabien, the pilot, was never far from our thinking. His lonely journey, buffeted by winds with only a simple compass and, at best, intermittent communication with the ground, reminded us of the needs of the knots. They, too, stop at San Antonio Bay, seeking a safe place to rest, refuel and do a little feather “maintenance” if needed before continuing on the way north, ultimately to the Canadian Arctic.
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Soon, we had “reincarnated” Fabien as a rather dapper Red Knot—Playero Rojizo in Spanish–complete with flying helmet and aviator’s scarf. We named him “Fabien Rojizo” and made him the symbol of shorebird conservation at San Antonio Bay. As part of a “Pride” campaign co-financed by Rare and Manomet, a human-sized version of Fabien visits schools, dances on the beach, attends meeting with mayors of other cities, and leads the annual shorebird festival at San Antonio Bay.
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And Fabien recently got a new plane! Recognizing the shared interests in the area’s natural, cultural and literary heritage, a partnership developed between Fundación Inalafquen and the 65-year-old Aeroclub San Antonio Oeste. During the upcoming edition of the San Antonio Bay Shorebird Festival, the Aeroclub-SAO will offer flights to get a shorebird’s eye view of the Bay.
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Recently, in honor of the shorebird festival and the new partnership, Aeroclub-SAO has named its 4-seat Piper Archer “Fabien Rojizo.” Fabien will continue to fly at San Antonio Bay along with the flocks of Red Knots, telling the story that has joined humans and shorebirds in the same sky for so many years.
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The great egg and spoonie race

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Written by WWT
The Oriental Bird Club is appealing for people to help them raise funds for the Spoon-billed Sandpiper conservation breeding programme.
Following the success of previous fund-raising events, the OBC is organising a sponsored run along the beautiful North Norfolk Coast to be held on Sunday 5 May 2013.
There will be something for everyone, whether you are a couch potato craving fitness or a seasoned runner looking to put your talent to a great cause. Although the distance is 40km in total, between Titchwell and Salthouse, the route is broken down into different sections of between 1 km and 10km . You can run as much or as little as you like.
For those of you who fancy celebrating your achievement with a well earned drink or two we have arranged for the finish to be at a famous Norfolk watering hole –  the Dun Cow at Salthouse. We look forward to seeing you there or en route!
If you wish to take part in this fun day or just donate to help save this beautiful bird then please contact Mike Edgecombe (m.edgecombe@virgin.net) or John Gregory (john.jane100@yahoo.com).

5th Meeting of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Group Announced

Written by Meredith Gutowski/WHSRN

Editor’s note: It is our pleasure to distribute the following announcement and invitation from our partner, Asociación Calidris.

Meeting V of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Group (WHSG) will be held in the Caribbean city of Santa Marta, Colombia, from 17 – 21 September 2013. The purpose of the meeting is to provide a platform for those interested in shorebirds to share their advances in research and conservation projects and to join collaborative initiatives trough the Western Hemisphere.

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Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) at Delta del Río Iscuandé WHSRN Site, Colombia. Courtesy of Asociación Calidris

We look forward to the participation of students, scientists, government agencies, academics and members of NGOs in the Western Hemisphere who can bring their experience and contribute to the knowledge and conservation of shorebirds. We seek governments, organizations, companies, and individuals who want to support the overall organization of the event and international travel for students and Latin American professionals.

Details about the meeting, including logistics, call for abstracts and symposia, and support for international travel will be soon available on the website of Asociación Calidris. Questions about the overall planning of the meeting may be directed to: Richard Johnston and Carlos José Ruiz. For general information about the event, please contact theCommunications staff.

Mark your calendars now!

The City of Santa Marta and Tayrona National Park are among the top ten destinations in 2012 selected by National Geographic Travel Magazine.

Editor’s note: On the northern Pacific coast of Colombia is the country’s first WHSRN Site, the Delta del Río Iscuandé, part of the impressive 89,000-hectare Sanquianga National Park.