Category of shorebird species changes 2010 IUCN Red List

Posted by BirdLife International

BirdLife International???s 2010 update of the IUCN Red List for birds follows the publication in 2008 of Threatened Birds of the World when all the world???s birds were comprehensively assessed against the IUCN Red List criteria. In 2010 a total of 10,027 species are recognised by BirdLife with the status of 113 species discussed on the Globally Threatened Bird discussion forums on BirdLife’s website, resulting in the IUCN Red List category being revised for 37 species. In addition, a number of taxonomic changes were incorporated. The table below gives the totals in each IUCN Red List category since 2000. The relatively small net changes to the totals mask the fact that 226 species moved between categories in 2000-2004, 99 species in 2004-2005, 150 in 2005-2006, 81 in 2006-2007, 147 in 2007-2008, 78 in 2008-2009 and 99 in 2009-2010 (see below). These include category revisions owing to improved knowledge and taxonomic changes, as well as genuine changes in status. Therefore, it is difficult to interpret the changes in absolute totals. Instead, it is better to examine trends in the Red List Index, which shows graphically the net changes to the overall projected extinction risk of the world???s birds from 1988 to 2008.

B_spoon-billed_sand_summer

?? Chris Kelly, Spoon-billed Sandpiper was uplisted to Critically Endangered in the 2008 IUCN Red List update

Species changing IUCN Red List
The table below lists all 99 species (including 5 shorebird species) whose IUCN Red List category was revised in May 2010 for the 2010 IUCN Red List. An explanation of the category codes and ‘Reason for change’ terms follows the table. Of the 99 category changes, 9 resulted from a genuine change in the status of species (1 improvement versus 8 deteriorations), 28 were a result of improved knowledge (of the status of species or the threats impacting them) and 61 resulted from taxonomic revisions (either recently published or recently evaluated/re-evaluated by BirdLife). Full explanations for the taxonomic changes are given in the Taxonomic notes field on the species factsheets, which are available through the Datazone.

Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula australis
2009 RL category: NR
2010 RL category: Endangered
Reason for change: Taxonomy (newly split)

Madagascar Snipe Gallinago macrodactyla
2009 RL category: Near Threatened
2010 RL category: Vulnerable
Reason for change: Knowledge

Far Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis
2009 RL category: Least Concern
2010 RL category: Vulnerable
Reason for change: Genuine (since first assessment)

Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris
2009 RL category: Least Concern
2010 RL category: Vulnerable
Reason for change: Genuine (since first assessment)

Somali Courser Cursorius somalensis
2009 RL category: NR
2010 RL category: Least Concern
Reason for change: Taxonomy (newly split)

Full list of species changing IUCN Red List can be read on BirdLife International’s News.

IUCN Red List categories

Reason for change
This is a code assigned by BirdLife whenever a species’s IUCN Red List Category is changed. The codes are:

Genuine (recent)
The change in category is the result of a genuine status change that has taken place since the last complete assessment. For example, the change is due to an increase in the rate of decline, a decrease in population or range size or habitat, or declines in these for the first time (owing to increasing/new threats) and therefore new thresholds are met relating to the IUCN Red List criteria.

Genuine (since first assessment)
The change in category is the result of a genuine status change that took place prior to the last complete assessment, but since the first complete assessment (1988) and that has only just been detected owing to new information/ documentation. If this new information had been available earlier, the new category would have been assigned during the previous assessment(s).

Criteria revision
The change in category is the result of the revision of the IUCN Red List Criteria (currently 1994 v. 2001 versions). These largely relate to criteria A2, A3, A4, D2 and the removal of the ‘Conservation Dependent’ category.

Knowledge
The change in category is the result of better knowledge, e.g. owing to new or newly synthesised information or better understanding of application of the IUCN Red List criteria.

Taxonomy
The new category is different from the previous one (which may be ‘Not Recognised’) owing to a taxonomic change adopted during the period since the previous assessment. Such changes include: newly split (the taxon is newly elevated to species level), newly described (the taxon is newly described as a species), newly lumped (the taxon is newly lumped with another species) and no longer valid/recognised (either the taxon is no longer valid e.g. because it is now considered to be a hybrid or variant, form or subspecies of another species, or the previously recognised taxon differs from a currently recognised one as a result of a split or lump).

Mistake
The previous category was applied in error (excluding those cases covered under Knowledge).

Other
The change in category is the result of other reasons not easily covered by the above, and/or requires further explanation.

Source: BirdLife International

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